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Circa Waves offers their debut album "Young Chasers" to indie fans.

Circa Waves offers their debut album “Young Chasers.”

All the way from Liverpool, England, Circa Waves brings their debut album “Young Chasers” to the US. Formed in 2013, the Indie Rock band is currently celebrating the release of their album with a European tour. The band gained some attention in March 2014 when they opened the New Music Express Awards, an annual music awards show in the United Kingdom.

Circa Waves is a band that epitomizes what indie rock sounds like. The band achieves a great sound, while reaching out to fans with their lyrics. Songs like “Stuck in My Teeth,” “T-Shirt Weather” and “Young Chasers” offer a lot of enjoyment to listeners.

The song that sticks out the most is “T-Shirt Weather.” It makes the listener feel nostalgic for long summer days and having a great time. The song has great instrumental elements that add to the lyrics to create longing feelings for the season.

“Stuck in My Teeth” is another song to look out for. “I’m a little too young with not enough time,” is the main line of the song and gives young people something to relate to.

“Young Chasers,” the song for which the album is named also offers great elements. This song is packed with energy and once again speaks to the young crowd. The combination of great vocals and instruments will make listeners want to put the song on repeat.

If you are looking for bands similar to Circa Wave, try Swim Deep, Wolf Alice and Lonely The Brave. This debut album gets four out of five stars because the group is a good example of what indie music is. Fans of the genre can rejoice in the sound of Circa Waves.

 

Circa Waves offers their debut album “Young Chasers.”

All the way from Liverpool, England, Circa Waves brings their debut album “Young Chasers” to the US. Formed in 2013, the Indie Rock band is currently celebrating the release of their album with a European tour. The band gained some attention in March 2014 when they opened the New Music Express Awards, an annual music awards show in the United Kingdom.

Circa Waves is a band that epitomizes what indie rock sounds like. The band achieves a great sound, while reaching out to fans with their lyrics. Songs like “Stuck in My Teeth,” “T-Shirt Weather” and “Young Chasers” offer a lot of enjoyment to listeners.

The song that sticks out the most is “T-Shirt Weather.” It makes the listener feel nostalgic for long summer days and having a great time. The song has great instrumental elements that add to the lyrics to create longing feelings for the season.

“Stuck in My Teeth” is another song to look out for. “I’m a little too young with not enough time,” is the main line of the song and gives young people something to relate to.

“Young Chasers,” the song for which the album is named also offers great elements. This song is packed with energy and once again speaks to the young crowd. The combination of great vocals and instruments will make listeners want to put the song on repeat.

If you are looking for bands similar to Circa Wave, try Swim Deep, Wolf Alice and Lonely The Brave. This debut album gets four out of five stars because the group is a good example of what indie music is. Fans of the genre can rejoice in the sound of Circa Waves.

 

There are dozens of venues in Salt Lake City where you can see concerts. Most of them are usually big shows, but there are still chances to catch local bands. However, sometimes driving all the way to Salt Lake isn’t convenient.

Luckily Ogden is becoming a hotspot for local bands to play. This summer the Twilight Concert Series that normally takes place in Salt Lake is coming to Ogden. Similarly, the small music venue called Mojos offers great shows with up and coming bands from around the area.

Mojos has been giving Ogdenites live music since 2003. It offers shows for all ages, and is located near the Megaplex 13 on Washington Boulevard. The venue is small, making the shows personal and fun to watch.

This weekend will feature a show with five local bands. SoupStuF, Eat Crow, Alter Ego, Chronicle Trio and Lucid Landing will play Saturday night starting at 8 p.m.

The five man group SoupStuF comes from Salt Lake City and according to their website their job is “Bringing to your ears a Funky Fresh Flavor of Fantasm.” The band even does a cover of the popular hit “Take on Me.” They have a video on their website of the song.

Eat Crow is from Kaysville. This band delivers a sound similar to The Black Keys, Green Day, Black Sabbath and The White Stripes. They say they’re “just four guys who want to rock and share it with the world.” The band has an original song up on their Reverbnation site called “Anti” that is worth a listen.

Alter Ego, from Davis County, released their first EP in January. The five-song EP is on sale on a website linked to their Facebook page. Listeners are able to buy the tracks to stream online. The band offers an original and unique sound.

Jazz/rock group Chronicle Trio from Salt Lake will also be in the lineup for Saturday. This group also has a few songs available for streaming that can be found on Facebook. The album entitled “The Renaissance Mixtape” has a funky, unique sound that is captured in the recording and will sound even better at Mojos.

Finally, Lucid Landing, originally from Clearfield, will join the lineup for the evening. The band mentions on their Facebook page that they are “A new alternative rock band with a wide range of varieties and materials.”

The band has posted three songs for fans to enjoy. “Thunder” is one of the songs featured on the page and one comment mentioned the song is “heart-wrenchingly beautiful.”

 

There are dozens of venues in Salt Lake City where you can see concerts. Most of them are usually big shows, but there are still chances to catch local bands. However, sometimes driving all the way to Salt Lake isn’t convenient.

Luckily Ogden is becoming a hotspot for local bands to play. This summer the Twilight Concert Series that normally takes place in Salt Lake is coming to Ogden. Similarly, the small music venue called Mojos offers great shows with up and coming bands from around the area.

Mojos has been giving Ogdenites live music since 2003. It offers shows for all ages, and is located near the Megaplex 13 on Washington Boulevard. The venue is small, making the shows personal and fun to watch.

This weekend will feature a show with five local bands. SoupStuF, Eat Crow, Alter Ego, Chronicle Trio and Lucid Landing will play Saturday night starting at 8 p.m.

The five man group SoupStuF comes from Salt Lake City and according to their website their job is “Bringing to your ears a Funky Fresh Flavor of Fantasm.” The band even does a cover of the popular hit “Take on Me.” They have a video on their website of the song.

Eat Crow is from Kaysville. This band delivers a sound similar to The Black Keys, Green Day, Black Sabbath and The White Stripes. They say they’re “just four guys who want to rock and share it with the world.” The band has an original song up on their Reverbnation site called “Anti” that is worth a listen.

Alter Ego, from Davis County, released their first EP in January. The five-song EP is on sale on a website linked to their Facebook page. Listeners are able to buy the tracks to stream online. The band offers an original and unique sound.

Jazz/rock group Chronicle Trio from Salt Lake will also be in the lineup for Saturday. This group also has a few songs available for streaming that can be found on Facebook. The album entitled “The Renaissance Mixtape” has a funky, unique sound that is captured in the recording and will sound even better at Mojos.

Finally, Lucid Landing, originally from Clearfield, will join the lineup for the evening. The band mentions on their Facebook page that they are “A new alternative rock band with a wide range of varieties and materials.”

The band has posted three songs for fans to enjoy. “Thunder” is one of the songs featured on the page and one comment mentioned the song is “heart-wrenchingly beautiful.”

 

La estación de radio KWCR celebra su 50 aniversario

La estación de radio KWCR celebra su 50 aniversario

La estación de radio de la Universidad Estatal de Weber KWCR 88,1 pasó de las ondas de radio a el plantel la semana pasada para celebrar su 50 aniversario.

“KWCR ha estado transmitiendo en FM durante 50 años. Eso es bastante impresionante, teniendo en cuenta que está a cargo de los estudiantes. Así que pensamos que era monumental y algo de lo que se debe estar orgulloso”, dijo el gerente general de KWCR Juan “JP” Orquiz.

Después de cinco décadas de la radiodifusión, la estación de radio dirigida por estudiantes organizó varios eventos para celebrar desde el 13 de abril hasta el 17 en honor a la historia de KWCR en el campus y en todo Ogden.

La emisora ​​de radio no comercial empezó a emitir en 1965, cuando la FCC les concedió licencias para ejecutar una estación de radio de 10 vatios FM, según el sitio web de KWCR .

El asesor actual de KWCR, Eric Harvey dijo que el aniversario de la emisora ​​de radio es una buena forma de dar a conocer su presencia en la radiodifusión.

“Si bien la revolución digital podría haber tomado una gran cantidad de aficionados a la música a otros lugares, sólo queríamos recordar a la gente que todavía tenemos una estación de radio de 50 años de edad, aquí en el campus”, dijo.

A lo largo de los años, la estación ha cambiado de ubicación, personal e incluso su título, pasando por nombres como “The Beat”, “The Edge”, y “Weber FM,” hasta llegar al título actual “KWCR”.

Según Harvey, los miembros del personal estudiantil  filtran casi 50 álbumes a la semana en busca de nueva música alternativa y nuevo talento, especialmente de bandas locales.

Los miembros del personal tocan una amplia gama de música. Apartarse de la corriente principal, la estación se adhiere principalmente a sus raíces más “underground”, dijo Harvey.

“Tocamos principalmente indie rock, el rock, la música punk y la música popular”, dijo Harvey. “Sin embargo, el propósito principal de la estación es el de servir la Universidad Estatal de Weber y a la comunidad Ogden con emisiones de entretenimiento e información.”

La estación de radio es principalmente dirigida por estudiantes. Según Orquiz, los miembros del personal estudiantil crean todos los contenidos y la mayor parte de la música está comisariada por los estudiantes en listas de reproducción.

Para él, esto es lo que hace único a KWCR.

“Hay listas de reproducción en línea en todo el mundo, pero la estación de radio estudiantil esta creada de una manera aún mejor”, dijo Orquiz. “En realidad, estamos tomando el tiempo para buscar y escoger lo mejor de la música.”

Aparte de dar a los estudiantes la oportunidad de experimentar dentro de los lineamientos establecidos por la Comisión Federal de Comunicaciones, KWCR también transmite cuatro horas de música todos los domingos y ofrece programación en español. Además, la programación de los miércoles se dedica específicamente a alentar a los estudiantes a cursar estudios superiores.

Orquiz creció escuchando la estación de radio cuando se llamaba “The Beat”, y dijo que la estación le inspiró a transmitir su propio trabajo. Según él, ser parte de la estación de radio es una gran oportunidad para tocar y decir lo que uno quiera, a pesar de que haya gente a la que no le guste.

“A pesar de las cosas que tocamos puede o puede que no sea popular, sigue siendo una oportunidad genial para tocar lo que quieras y ser parte de una estación de  radio como esta que no existe como en el entorno corporativo”, dijo.

Sin embargo, usted no tiene que ser un DJ para formar parte del estudio, dijo Harvey. Según su sitio web, la estación ofrece experiencia práctica en múltiples áreas, con posiciones que van desde asociaciones con empresas locales hasta directores de medios sociales que promueven la estación.

“Puede ser parte de su experiencia aquí en la universidad, estar al aire y dejar que la gente sepa lo que tiene que decir o que trabajar entre bastidores para ayudar a crecer KWCR “, dijo Harvey.

Aunque toda una semana de actividades se alineaban para celebrar el 50 aniversario de la estación de radio, la celebración no ocurrió sin algunos contratiempos.

Según Orquiz, debido a los conflictos climáticos de última hora, el giant root-beer pong tuvo que ser reprogramado para el 21 de abril a las 10 a.m.

A pesar de este contratiempo, el estudio mantuvo la celebración y se pasó la semana animando a los estudiantes a involucrarse con la estación de radio.

Orquiz dijo que espera que los estudiantes sientan orgullo por su estación de radio de la universidad.

“Parece que estamos a la banda de gamberros que maneja este organismo de radiodifusión”, dijo Orquiz . “Llevamos a cabo una emisora ​​de radio y punto.”

Translated by Ingrid Maldonado.

To read the story in English click here

La estación de radio KWCR celebra su 50 aniversario

La estación de radio de la Universidad Estatal de Weber KWCR 88,1 pasó de las ondas de radio a el plantel la semana pasada para celebrar su 50 aniversario.

“KWCR ha estado transmitiendo en FM durante 50 años. Eso es bastante impresionante, teniendo en cuenta que está a cargo de los estudiantes. Así que pensamos que era monumental y algo de lo que se debe estar orgulloso”, dijo el gerente general de KWCR Juan “JP” Orquiz.

Después de cinco décadas de la radiodifusión, la estación de radio dirigida por estudiantes organizó varios eventos para celebrar desde el 13 de abril hasta el 17 en honor a la historia de KWCR en el campus y en todo Ogden.

La emisora ​​de radio no comercial empezó a emitir en 1965, cuando la FCC les concedió licencias para ejecutar una estación de radio de 10 vatios FM, según el sitio web de KWCR .

El asesor actual de KWCR, Eric Harvey dijo que el aniversario de la emisora ​​de radio es una buena forma de dar a conocer su presencia en la radiodifusión.

“Si bien la revolución digital podría haber tomado una gran cantidad de aficionados a la música a otros lugares, sólo queríamos recordar a la gente que todavía tenemos una estación de radio de 50 años de edad, aquí en el campus”, dijo.

A lo largo de los años, la estación ha cambiado de ubicación, personal e incluso su título, pasando por nombres como “The Beat”, “The Edge”, y “Weber FM,” hasta llegar al título actual “KWCR”.

Según Harvey, los miembros del personal estudiantil  filtran casi 50 álbumes a la semana en busca de nueva música alternativa y nuevo talento, especialmente de bandas locales.

Los miembros del personal tocan una amplia gama de música. Apartarse de la corriente principal, la estación se adhiere principalmente a sus raíces más “underground”, dijo Harvey.

“Tocamos principalmente indie rock, el rock, la música punk y la música popular”, dijo Harvey. “Sin embargo, el propósito principal de la estación es el de servir la Universidad Estatal de Weber y a la comunidad Ogden con emisiones de entretenimiento e información.”

La estación de radio es principalmente dirigida por estudiantes. Según Orquiz, los miembros del personal estudiantil crean todos los contenidos y la mayor parte de la música está comisariada por los estudiantes en listas de reproducción.

Para él, esto es lo que hace único a KWCR.

“Hay listas de reproducción en línea en todo el mundo, pero la estación de radio estudiantil esta creada de una manera aún mejor”, dijo Orquiz. “En realidad, estamos tomando el tiempo para buscar y escoger lo mejor de la música.”

Aparte de dar a los estudiantes la oportunidad de experimentar dentro de los lineamientos establecidos por la Comisión Federal de Comunicaciones, KWCR también transmite cuatro horas de música todos los domingos y ofrece programación en español. Además, la programación de los miércoles se dedica específicamente a alentar a los estudiantes a cursar estudios superiores.

Orquiz creció escuchando la estación de radio cuando se llamaba “The Beat”, y dijo que la estación le inspiró a transmitir su propio trabajo. Según él, ser parte de la estación de radio es una gran oportunidad para tocar y decir lo que uno quiera, a pesar de que haya gente a la que no le guste.

“A pesar de las cosas que tocamos puede o puede que no sea popular, sigue siendo una oportunidad genial para tocar lo que quieras y ser parte de una estación de  radio como esta que no existe como en el entorno corporativo”, dijo.

Sin embargo, usted no tiene que ser un DJ para formar parte del estudio, dijo Harvey. Según su sitio web, la estación ofrece experiencia práctica en múltiples áreas, con posiciones que van desde asociaciones con empresas locales hasta directores de medios sociales que promueven la estación.

“Puede ser parte de su experiencia aquí en la universidad, estar al aire y dejar que la gente sepa lo que tiene que decir o que trabajar entre bastidores para ayudar a crecer KWCR “, dijo Harvey.

Aunque toda una semana de actividades se alineaban para celebrar el 50 aniversario de la estación de radio, la celebración no ocurrió sin algunos contratiempos.

Según Orquiz, debido a los conflictos climáticos de última hora, el giant root-beer pong tuvo que ser reprogramado para el 21 de abril a las 10 a.m.

A pesar de este contratiempo, el estudio mantuvo la celebración y se pasó la semana animando a los estudiantes a involucrarse con la estación de radio.

Orquiz dijo que espera que los estudiantes sientan orgullo por su estación de radio de la universidad.

“Parece que estamos a la banda de gamberros que maneja este organismo de radiodifusión”, dijo Orquiz . “Llevamos a cabo una emisora ​​de radio y punto.”

Translated by Ingrid Maldonado.

To read the story in English click here

Weber State’s radio station KWCR 88.1 went from the airwaves to campus grounds this past week to celebrate its 50th anniversary. “KWCR has been broadcasting in FM for 50 years. That is pretty impressive, considering it’s run by students. So we thought that was monumental and something to be proud of,” said KWCR general manager Juan “JP” Orquiz. After five decades of broadcasting, the student-run radio station hosted several celebratory events from April 13-17 in honor of KWCR’s history on campus and throughout Ogden. The non-commercial radio station started broadcasting in 1965 when the FCC granted them licensing to run a 10-watt FM radio station, according to the KWCR website.  

radio_2

The KWCR radio station back in its earlier stages of broadcasting. (Source: KWCR Press Release Photos)

Current KWCR advisor Eric Harvey said the radio station’s anniversary was a great way to raise awareness of its broadcasting presence. “While the digital revolution might have taken a lot of music fans elsewhere, we just wanted to remind people that we still have a 50-year-old radio station here on campus,” he said. Throughout the years, the station has changed location, staff and even its title, going through names such as “The Beat,” “The Edge,” and “Weber FM,” to the current title “KWCR.” According to Harvey, the student staff members filter through nearly 50 albums a week in search for new alternative music and fresh talent, especially from local bands. The staff members play a broad range of music. Straying from mainstream, the station primarily sticks to its more “underground” roots, said Harvey.  “We play primarily indie rock, rock music, punk music and folk music,” said Harvey. “However, the main purpose of the station is to serve Weber State and the Ogden community with entertaining and informative broadcasts.” The radio station is primarily student-run. According to Orquiz, the student staff members create all the content and most of the music is custom curated by students into playlists.   For him, this is what makes KWCR unique.   “There’s playlists everywhere online, but the student radio station is created in a way that is even better,” Orquiz said. “We are actually taking the time to feed through and pick out the very best music.” Along with giving students the chance to experiment within guidelines set by the Federal Communications Commission, KWCR also broadcasts four hours of music every Sunday and offers Spanish-language programming. Additionally, the Wednesday show is specifically devoted to encouraging students to pursue higher education. Orquiz grew up listening to the radio station back when it was “The Beat,” and said the station inspired him to broadcast his own work. According to him, being part of the radio station is a great opportunity to play and say what you want, regardless if some people may not like it. “Although the stuff we play may or may not be popular, it’s still a really cool opportunity to play what you want and be part of radio that doesn’t exist quite like this in the corporate setting,” he said.    However, you don’t have to be a DJ to be part of the studio, said Harvey. According to their website, the station offers hands-on experience in multiple areas, with positions ranging from partnerships with local businesses to social media directors who promote the station.

radio

General manager Juan “JP” Orquiz works in the studio for the student-run radio station KWCR 88.1 FM. (Source: KWCR Press Release Photos)

“It can be part of your experience here at Weber State, getting on the air and letting people know what you have to say or working behind the scenes to help KWCR rise,” said Harvey. Although a whole week of activities were lined up to celebrate the radio’s 50th birthday, celebrations did not go off without a few hitches. According to Orquiz, due to last-minute weather conflicts, the giant root-beer pong had to be rescheduled to April 21 at 10 a.m. Despite this setback, the studio kept up the celebration and  spent the week encouraging students to get involved. Orquiz said he hoped students got a new sense of pride for their college radio station. “It seems like we are just  band of hooligans running this broadcasting organization,” said Orquiz. “We run a radio station, and that’s the quick and dirty of it.”  Weber State’s radio station KWCR 88.1 went from the airwaves to campus grounds this past week to celebrate its 50th anniversary. “KWCR has been broadcasting in FM for 50 years. That is pretty impressive, considering it’s run by students. So we thought that was monumental and something to be proud of,” said KWCR general manager Juan “JP” Orquiz. After five decades of broadcasting, the student-run radio station hosted several celebratory events from April 13-17 in honor of KWCR’s history on campus and throughout Ogden. The non-commercial radio station started broadcasting in 1965 when the FCC granted them licensing to run a 10-watt FM radio station, according to the KWCR website.  

The KWCR radio station back in its earlier stages of broadcasting. (Source: KWCR Press Release Photos)

Current KWCR advisor Eric Harvey said the radio station’s anniversary was a great way to raise awareness of its broadcasting presence. “While the digital revolution might have taken a lot of music fans elsewhere, we just wanted to remind people that we still have a 50-year-old radio station here on campus,” he said. Throughout the years, the station has changed location, staff and even its title, going through names such as “The Beat,” “The Edge,” and “Weber FM,” to the current title “KWCR.” According to Harvey, the student staff members filter through nearly 50 albums a week in search for new alternative music and fresh talent, especially from local bands. The staff members play a broad range of music. Straying from mainstream, the station primarily sticks to its more “underground” roots, said Harvey.  “We play primarily indie rock, rock music, punk music and folk music,” said Harvey. “However, the main purpose of the station is to serve Weber State and the Ogden community with entertaining and informative broadcasts.” The radio station is primarily student-run. According to Orquiz, the student staff members create all the content and most of the music is custom curated by students into playlists.   For him, this is what makes KWCR unique.   “There’s playlists everywhere online, but the student radio station is created in a way that is even better,” Orquiz said. “We are actually taking the time to feed through and pick out the very best music.” Along with giving students the chance to experiment within guidelines set by the Federal Communications Commission, KWCR also broadcasts four hours of music every Sunday and offers Spanish-language programming. Additionally, the Wednesday show is specifically devoted to encouraging students to pursue higher education. Orquiz grew up listening to the radio station back when it was “The Beat,” and said the station inspired him to broadcast his own work. According to him, being part of the radio station is a great opportunity to play and say what you want, regardless if some people may not like it. “Although the stuff we play may or may not be popular, it’s still a really cool opportunity to play what you want and be part of radio that doesn’t exist quite like this in the corporate setting,” he said.    However, you don’t have to be a DJ to be part of the studio, said Harvey. According to their website, the station offers hands-on experience in multiple areas, with positions ranging from partnerships with local businesses to social media directors who promote the station.

General manager Juan “JP” Orquiz works in the studio for the student-run radio station KWCR 88.1 FM. (Source: KWCR Press Release Photos)

“It can be part of your experience here at Weber State, getting on the air and letting people know what you have to say or working behind the scenes to help KWCR rise,” said Harvey. Although a whole week of activities were lined up to celebrate the radio’s 50th birthday, celebrations did not go off without a few hitches. According to Orquiz, due to last-minute weather conflicts, the giant root-beer pong had to be rescheduled to April 21 at 10 a.m. Despite this setback, the studio kept up the celebration and  spent the week encouraging students to get involved. Orquiz said he hoped students got a new sense of pride for their college radio station. “It seems like we are just  band of hooligans running this broadcasting organization,” said Orquiz. “We run a radio station, and that’s the quick and dirty of it.” 
Luke Bryan performs during the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, California, on April 28, 2012. (Source Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times/MCT)

Luke Bryan performs during the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, California on April 28, 2012. (Source Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times/Tribune News Service)

Summer is rounding the corner, and so are summer concerts.

Luke Bryan

For any country fans out there, Luke Bryan will be coming to town Wednesday, August 26 at the USANA Amphitheater. Tickets will be priced at $75 per ticket.

This will give die-hard Luke Bryan fans the chance to see the country rock star in concert.

Jon Bellion

This rising pop star will be performing in Utah on Monday, June 1 at The Grand @ The Complex. Tickets for Bellion’s concert will be $15.

Bellion is a songwriter, as well as an aspiring rapper, whose first album release, “Scattered Thoughts Vol 1,” reached over 11,000 downloads.

Twenty One Pilots

This alternative rock band will come to Utah Saturday, September 26 at the Saltair in Magna. Tickets will run for $32.

Twenty One Pilots is an American duo from Columbus, Ohio, which formed back in 2009. Fans of Twenty One Pilots can expect their new album, “Blurryface,” on May 19.

Sam Smith

This English singer and songwriter is coming to town on August 5 at the Maverick Center. Tickets will range from $52 to $993 (the latter for front-row seating).

Smith rose to fame in 2012 with his single “Latch,” reaching eleventh on UK single charts.

Nickelback

Nickelback and Lifehouse are coming in concert at the USANA Amphitheater on July 5. Tickets range from $20 to $85.

Nickelback is a Canadian band, who has risen in the charts since 1995, selling over 50 million albums worldwide.

Twilight Concert series  

The Twilight concert series comes to Pioneer Park in Salt Lake City, running Thursday nights during the summer. Concerts start on July 16 and go through August 27. To kick off the summer, Indie band Death Cab for Cutie will be first in the lineup.

Tickets for this concert series are on sale now for $30. Once the full lineup for the series is released, all tickets will be raised in price to $35.

Students can look forward to these upcoming concerts to kick off the beginning and end of summer.

 

 

Luke Bryan performs during the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, California on April 28, 2012. (Source Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times/Tribune News Service)

Summer is rounding the corner, and so are summer concerts.

Luke Bryan

For any country fans out there, Luke Bryan will be coming to town Wednesday, August 26 at the USANA Amphitheater. Tickets will be priced at $75 per ticket.

This will give die-hard Luke Bryan fans the chance to see the country rock star in concert.

Jon Bellion

This rising pop star will be performing in Utah on Monday, June 1 at The Grand @ The Complex. Tickets for Bellion’s concert will be $15.

Bellion is a songwriter, as well as an aspiring rapper, whose first album release, “Scattered Thoughts Vol 1,” reached over 11,000 downloads.

Twenty One Pilots

This alternative rock band will come to Utah Saturday, September 26 at the Saltair in Magna. Tickets will run for $32.

Twenty One Pilots is an American duo from Columbus, Ohio, which formed back in 2009. Fans of Twenty One Pilots can expect their new album, “Blurryface,” on May 19.

Sam Smith

This English singer and songwriter is coming to town on August 5 at the Maverick Center. Tickets will range from $52 to $993 (the latter for front-row seating).

Smith rose to fame in 2012 with his single “Latch,” reaching eleventh on UK single charts.

Nickelback

Nickelback and Lifehouse are coming in concert at the USANA Amphitheater on July 5. Tickets range from $20 to $85.

Nickelback is a Canadian band, who has risen in the charts since 1995, selling over 50 million albums worldwide.

Twilight Concert series  

The Twilight concert series comes to Pioneer Park in Salt Lake City, running Thursday nights during the summer. Concerts start on July 16 and go through August 27. To kick off the summer, Indie band Death Cab for Cutie will be first in the lineup.

Tickets for this concert series are on sale now for $30. Once the full lineup for the series is released, all tickets will be raised in price to $35.

Students can look forward to these upcoming concerts to kick off the beginning and end of summer.

 

 

The Cribs "For All My Sisters"

The Cribs “For All My Sisters”

UK brother band The Cribs offers listeners their sixth album titled “For All My Sisters.”

Over the last year, the band convened with The Cars front man Ric Ocasek for this album. According to The Syndicate, the band has a new perspective which comes along with new challenges. The band continues to evolve and thrill “whilst stockpiling an enviable arsenal of songs,” The Syndicate said.

Twins Gary and Ryan along with their younger sibling Ross formed The Cribs back in 2002 through Squirrel Records. Following several successes, the brothers have collaborated with many different people in past albums. Currently with Sonic Blew records, Gary mentioned on the band’s Facebook page that the aim is to “make a better record each time.”

The Cribs are able to achieve a lot in one single album. “For All My Sisters” is an album that can reach fans of many different tastes in music. Great beats and even better vocals let listeners soak in the good vibes from the band. The album starts out in a cheerful and energized way, which is not only entertaining but it makes listeners want to see what else is in store.

One of the best songs on the album is “Diamond Girl.” It’s a song about being yourself, which everyone can relate to. Similarly, the song “Burning for No One” has an amazing beat to it and a good rock n’ roll vibe.

The coolest song on this album was “An Ivory Hand.” There was something about this song that will make you want to dance around while listening to it. One can also appreciate that the band is able to incorporate electronic sounds without becoming overwhelming for the listener.

One  issue new listeners might encounter is that many of the songs blend together. It’s not until the song “Pink Snow” that listeners get to see a different side of The Cribs. The song is slow and has a melancholic tone to it. The band expresses variation through lyrics like, “To all my sisters, I promise you that I’ll try and be brave for you.”

If The Cribs are a sound you enjoy check out The Rakes, Mystery Jets or The View. The Cribs “For All My Sisters” is a three star album for this reviewer. They have energy and a good sound that many can enjoy without difficulty.

 

The Cribs “For All My Sisters”

UK brother band The Cribs offers listeners their sixth album titled “For All My Sisters.”

Over the last year, the band convened with The Cars front man Ric Ocasek for this album. According to The Syndicate, the band has a new perspective which comes along with new challenges. The band continues to evolve and thrill “whilst stockpiling an enviable arsenal of songs,” The Syndicate said.

Twins Gary and Ryan along with their younger sibling Ross formed The Cribs back in 2002 through Squirrel Records. Following several successes, the brothers have collaborated with many different people in past albums. Currently with Sonic Blew records, Gary mentioned on the band’s Facebook page that the aim is to “make a better record each time.”

The Cribs are able to achieve a lot in one single album. “For All My Sisters” is an album that can reach fans of many different tastes in music. Great beats and even better vocals let listeners soak in the good vibes from the band. The album starts out in a cheerful and energized way, which is not only entertaining but it makes listeners want to see what else is in store.

One of the best songs on the album is “Diamond Girl.” It’s a song about being yourself, which everyone can relate to. Similarly, the song “Burning for No One” has an amazing beat to it and a good rock n’ roll vibe.

The coolest song on this album was “An Ivory Hand.” There was something about this song that will make you want to dance around while listening to it. One can also appreciate that the band is able to incorporate electronic sounds without becoming overwhelming for the listener.

One  issue new listeners might encounter is that many of the songs blend together. It’s not until the song “Pink Snow” that listeners get to see a different side of The Cribs. The song is slow and has a melancholic tone to it. The band expresses variation through lyrics like, “To all my sisters, I promise you that I’ll try and be brave for you.”

If The Cribs are a sound you enjoy check out The Rakes, Mystery Jets or The View. The Cribs “For All My Sisters” is a three star album for this reviewer. They have energy and a good sound that many can enjoy without difficulty.

 

Torche is a group geared towards lovers of heavy music.

Torche is a group geared towards lovers of heavier music.

For many metal fans—myself included—the harder the music, the better.

Hailing from Florida, the rock band Torche was formed in 2004, and they claim they are a band that is “playing the loudest and heaviest in hard rock.” Their new album “Restarter” was released this passed March, and fans of heavier music can definitely enjoy this group.

The album starts out with a heavy rhythm and effects that make this metal enthusiast feel right at home. The band creates amazing sounds with some songs that are slow with repeating rhythms. The song “Minions” is an example of this. The steady sound of heavy guitar drives the song at a slow pace that let’s listeners focus on the vocals of the track.

Contrasted by the song “Loose Men,” Torche accomplishes a different feel. It mixes in different elements to make the song more upbeat and lively. Still including a heavy, driving rhythm, the faster pace makes this a song for listeners to rock out to.

Similarly, the shorter track titled “Undone” is a song for listeners to just head bang to. The song is only a minute and 40 seconds long—just long enough to head bang to without hurting your neck too badly.

Admittedly, many of the songs tend to blend together. This group tends to use the same rhythm or slight variations thereof, making listeners long for something a little different. Making songs different without sacrificing their style and still sticking with the overall theme of the album is something many bands have yet to master.

Bands such as Baroness, Floor and High on Fire are groups that you’ll want to look up if you enjoy Torche. This album gets three out of five stars from me because while I enjoyed the heaviness and that it speaks to my love of metal, I was looking for songs that really stuck out and didn’t sound so similar.

 

Torche is a group geared towards lovers of heavier music.

For many metal fans—myself included—the harder the music, the better.

Hailing from Florida, the rock band Torche was formed in 2004, and they claim they are a band that is “playing the loudest and heaviest in hard rock.” Their new album “Restarter” was released this passed March, and fans of heavier music can definitely enjoy this group.

The album starts out with a heavy rhythm and effects that make this metal enthusiast feel right at home. The band creates amazing sounds with some songs that are slow with repeating rhythms. The song “Minions” is an example of this. The steady sound of heavy guitar drives the song at a slow pace that let’s listeners focus on the vocals of the track.

Contrasted by the song “Loose Men,” Torche accomplishes a different feel. It mixes in different elements to make the song more upbeat and lively. Still including a heavy, driving rhythm, the faster pace makes this a song for listeners to rock out to.

Similarly, the shorter track titled “Undone” is a song for listeners to just head bang to. The song is only a minute and 40 seconds long—just long enough to head bang to without hurting your neck too badly.

Admittedly, many of the songs tend to blend together. This group tends to use the same rhythm or slight variations thereof, making listeners long for something a little different. Making songs different without sacrificing their style and still sticking with the overall theme of the album is something many bands have yet to master.

Bands such as Baroness, Floor and High on Fire are groups that you’ll want to look up if you enjoy Torche. This album gets three out of five stars from me because while I enjoyed the heaviness and that it speaks to my love of metal, I was looking for songs that really stuck out and didn’t sound so similar.

 

(Photo Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts and Humanities)

Choral singers perform gospel, folk and classical vocal pieces at the Austad Auditorium in the Browning Center. (Photo Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts and Humanities)

Southern gospel music, traditional folk songs and classical vocal pieces will all be found this Thursday at Weber State’s Spring Choirfest.

This event, held in the Austad auditorium in the Browning Center at 7:30 p.m., will be the last concert event of the season for WSU’s choir and chamber choir. Both have been preparing for two months perfecting the songs and preparing a show for the audience to enjoy.

Christie Denniston, director of marketing and public relations, feels that this show will be unique because of the talent that will be on stage.

“I think one of the attributes that distinguishes this performance is that some world class performers are going to go on and perform professionally,” Denniston said. “It is one of the audiences last chance to see some of these individuals here on our stage as students before they go out into the world and perform.”

Graduating senior and vocal performance major Derek Myler felt his last performance has a lot of variety with songs and a lot of talent on stage. Derek felt this show stands out in the type of music being performed.

“We are doing a set in a music called a sacred harp tradition which is a style of choral singing which started in the south,” said Myler. “It is really, really rare that is done on a concert stage.”

It’s not only the songs that are challenging. Many of the performers not only sing but also play instruments or conduct for the performance. Myler plays piano for a couple songs and fellow senior Carolyn Kingston helped conduct pieces.

Myler and Kingston both had challenges with their performances.

“It made me stop and think what my conducting style is,” said Kingston. “I had to consider what I got from the music and what I wanted them to do.”

One song that Myler and Kingston both feel the audience will appreciate is “Baba Yetu,” the Lord’s Prayer performed in Swahili.

“I think the audience will enjoy ‘Baba Yetu.’ It will be done with traditional African sound and some soloists are going to be doing some improvisation,” said Myler. “It is a very fun and lively piece.”

For Kingston, singing and conducting as a senior have made her realize why she likes to perform on stage.

“(We) are sharing something that is very personal and a big part of ourselves when we perform or sing together,” said Kingston.

This concert will have a wide variety of songs performed and the performers have put everything they have into each song.

“It is always good for people to come out and see some diversity,” said Myler. “(This diversity) I think is something beneficial for people to expose themselves to.”

Choral singers perform gospel, folk and classical vocal pieces at the Austad Auditorium in the Browning Center. (Photo Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts and Humanities)

Southern gospel music, traditional folk songs and classical vocal pieces will all be found this Thursday at Weber State’s Spring Choirfest.

This event, held in the Austad auditorium in the Browning Center at 7:30 p.m., will be the last concert event of the season for WSU’s choir and chamber choir. Both have been preparing for two months perfecting the songs and preparing a show for the audience to enjoy.

Christie Denniston, director of marketing and public relations, feels that this show will be unique because of the talent that will be on stage.

“I think one of the attributes that distinguishes this performance is that some world class performers are going to go on and perform professionally,” Denniston said. “It is one of the audiences last chance to see some of these individuals here on our stage as students before they go out into the world and perform.”

Graduating senior and vocal performance major Derek Myler felt his last performance has a lot of variety with songs and a lot of talent on stage. Derek felt this show stands out in the type of music being performed.

“We are doing a set in a music called a sacred harp tradition which is a style of choral singing which started in the south,” said Myler. “It is really, really rare that is done on a concert stage.”

It’s not only the songs that are challenging. Many of the performers not only sing but also play instruments or conduct for the performance. Myler plays piano for a couple songs and fellow senior Carolyn Kingston helped conduct pieces.

Myler and Kingston both had challenges with their performances.

“It made me stop and think what my conducting style is,” said Kingston. “I had to consider what I got from the music and what I wanted them to do.”

One song that Myler and Kingston both feel the audience will appreciate is “Baba Yetu,” the Lord’s Prayer performed in Swahili.

“I think the audience will enjoy ‘Baba Yetu.’ It will be done with traditional African sound and some soloists are going to be doing some improvisation,” said Myler. “It is a very fun and lively piece.”

For Kingston, singing and conducting as a senior have made her realize why she likes to perform on stage.

“(We) are sharing something that is very personal and a big part of ourselves when we perform or sing together,” said Kingston.

This concert will have a wide variety of songs performed and the performers have put everything they have into each song.

“It is always good for people to come out and see some diversity,” said Myler. “(This diversity) I think is something beneficial for people to expose themselves to.”

Piano major Ling-Yu Lee poses by the instrument she connected with since she was 6 years old. (Photo provided by Dr. Yu-Jane Yang.)

Piano major Ling-Yu Lee poses by the instrument she has connected with since she was 6 years old. (Photo Courtesy of Professor Yu-Jane Yang.)

Some students figure out what they want to do professionally during their time in college, while others come to college with a clear vision of their future. Some aspire to one day become doctors, teachers, reporters or business owners. For Weber State University junior Ling-Yu Lee, she knew what she wanted to be a professional pianist since high school.

Lee was born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan, where her family is currently living. After graduating high school, Lee moved to the United States to attend WSU as a piano performance major.

From a young age, Lee connected with the piano and began taking lessons when she was 6 years old. She began piano lessons from her aunt and progressed to advanced lessons while in third grade. While attending middle school in Taiwan, Lee became uncertain of her future with piano performance.

“I think one of the reasons I didn’t like it was because I was a little afraid of performing for people,” Lee said. “I thought maybe performing on stage just wasn’t for me.”

However, after a competition two years ago, Lee was approached by a professor who heard her perform.

“He came over and said that I touched his heart, and that gave me assurance that I should be doing piano,” Lee said.

Lee said that gradually through high school she found more confidence in her piano performance through supportive teachers.

“I think the training I’ve received here helped me focus on what I need to pay attention to as I’m playing,” Lee said. “I eventually got to where I didn’t care about the people around me.”

The piano major will also invite her friends to listen to her pieces before performances and give her feedback.

“They’re so supportive and super nice,” Lee said.

Cicely Fabiano, Sara Song and Katie Swainston are friends of Lee’s who have witnessed her musical performances. Swainston described Lee’s music as captivating.

“I love how Ling captures the audience with all her different colors, tones and characters in her music,” Swainston said. “She feels the music and because she feels the music, the audience can as well.”

Fabiano said that Lee’s position and body movement draws emotion from the audience as she plays.

“It’s so intense,” Fabiano said. “As she plays the notes, you can see from the expression on her face and the way her head and upper body move that she means what she plays.”

Song described Lee’s performances with one word: fabulous.

Lee has entered and won several musical competitions with her piano playing throughout her life. She recently won first place in the Utah Music Teacher Association competition entering her into the Southwest Division competition where she again won first place.

“I looked at my teacher and thought it couldn’t be real,” Lee said.

WSU Performing Arts Professor Yu-Jane Yang is Lee’s piano professor. Before Lee’s competitions, Yang reminds her that the key is to leave no questions in the judges’ minds.

“I tell Ling to let the music flow through her body, then come out of her fingers,” Yang said.

Aside from her piano competitions, Lee also focuses on her studies at WSU and spending time with her friends. She enjoys movies and being in the outdoors.

“Being from Taiwan in the big city, we don’t have a lot of outdoors,” Lee said. “So my friends and I went on a hike during spring break and it was fun.”

Once Lee graduates from Weber State University, she plans to attend graduate school in America to further her passion for playing the piano.

 

Piano major Ling-Yu Lee poses by the instrument she has connected with since she was 6 years old. (Photo Courtesy of Professor Yu-Jane Yang.)

Some students figure out what they want to do professionally during their time in college, while others come to college with a clear vision of their future. Some aspire to one day become doctors, teachers, reporters or business owners. For Weber State University junior Ling-Yu Lee, she knew what she wanted to be a professional pianist since high school.

Lee was born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan, where her family is currently living. After graduating high school, Lee moved to the United States to attend WSU as a piano performance major.

From a young age, Lee connected with the piano and began taking lessons when she was 6 years old. She began piano lessons from her aunt and progressed to advanced lessons while in third grade. While attending middle school in Taiwan, Lee became uncertain of her future with piano performance.

“I think one of the reasons I didn’t like it was because I was a little afraid of performing for people,” Lee said. “I thought maybe performing on stage just wasn’t for me.”

However, after a competition two years ago, Lee was approached by a professor who heard her perform.

“He came over and said that I touched his heart, and that gave me assurance that I should be doing piano,” Lee said.

Lee said that gradually through high school she found more confidence in her piano performance through supportive teachers.

“I think the training I’ve received here helped me focus on what I need to pay attention to as I’m playing,” Lee said. “I eventually got to where I didn’t care about the people around me.”

The piano major will also invite her friends to listen to her pieces before performances and give her feedback.

“They’re so supportive and super nice,” Lee said.

Cicely Fabiano, Sara Song and Katie Swainston are friends of Lee’s who have witnessed her musical performances. Swainston described Lee’s music as captivating.

“I love how Ling captures the audience with all her different colors, tones and characters in her music,” Swainston said. “She feels the music and because she feels the music, the audience can as well.”

Fabiano said that Lee’s position and body movement draws emotion from the audience as she plays.

“It’s so intense,” Fabiano said. “As she plays the notes, you can see from the expression on her face and the way her head and upper body move that she means what she plays.”

Song described Lee’s performances with one word: fabulous.

Lee has entered and won several musical competitions with her piano playing throughout her life. She recently won first place in the Utah Music Teacher Association competition entering her into the Southwest Division competition where she again won first place.

“I looked at my teacher and thought it couldn’t be real,” Lee said.

WSU Performing Arts Professor Yu-Jane Yang is Lee’s piano professor. Before Lee’s competitions, Yang reminds her that the key is to leave no questions in the judges’ minds.

“I tell Ling to let the music flow through her body, then come out of her fingers,” Yang said.

Aside from her piano competitions, Lee also focuses on her studies at WSU and spending time with her friends. She enjoys movies and being in the outdoors.

“Being from Taiwan in the big city, we don’t have a lot of outdoors,” Lee said. “So my friends and I went on a hike during spring break and it was fun.”

Once Lee graduates from Weber State University, she plans to attend graduate school in America to further her passion for playing the piano.

 

"Strangers to Ourselves" offers listeners a wide variety of elements to listen to.

“Strangers to Ourselves” offers listeners a wide variety of elements to listen to.

Alternative rock group Modest Mouse was formed in 1993, and over the last decade, they have become a staple for the genre. With the release of their second album in 1997, the band reached new heights with a legion of fans. The band has had two Grammy nominations and has spent time on the Billboard Top 200 at number one.

Their newest album “Strangers to Ourselves” starts out with a slow, orchestral rhythm that listeners can ease into. The track is calming, making listeners look forward to what else is to come. The preceding song is very upbeat and includes rapping, giving listeners a variance in sound.

One thing listeners should note  is the band’s ability to seamlessly blend sounds of actual instruments with computer generated sounds.

“The Ground Walks, with Time in a Box” also offers listeners a unique experience. This track has a very funky almost disco beat to it. “Pups to Dust” is a great song for listeners to relate to on this album. The song states, “Our hearts don’t change from pups to dust,” and “Love does not cost money but is not free.” These lyrics are heartfelt and give listeners something they can relate to and enjoy.

Another track listeners should focus on is “Sugar Boats.” This song offers an amazing use of piano and orchestral instruments that also fuses great sounding guitar riffs. With such a dedicated fan base, those who already enjoy Modest Mouse can rejoice at this album and enjoy it in its entirety. Those who don’t normally listen to this type of music can find solace in hearing something new and refreshing.

Fans of Modest Mouse will also enjoy Spoon, Death Cab for Cutie and Silversun Pickups. This album warrants three stars out of five. Because there are so many elements to enjoy, fans of all types of music can begin to enjoy this group.

“Strangers to Ourselves” offers listeners a wide variety of elements to listen to.

Alternative rock group Modest Mouse was formed in 1993, and over the last decade, they have become a staple for the genre. With the release of their second album in 1997, the band reached new heights with a legion of fans. The band has had two Grammy nominations and has spent time on the Billboard Top 200 at number one.

Their newest album “Strangers to Ourselves” starts out with a slow, orchestral rhythm that listeners can ease into. The track is calming, making listeners look forward to what else is to come. The preceding song is very upbeat and includes rapping, giving listeners a variance in sound.

One thing listeners should note  is the band’s ability to seamlessly blend sounds of actual instruments with computer generated sounds.

“The Ground Walks, with Time in a Box” also offers listeners a unique experience. This track has a very funky almost disco beat to it. “Pups to Dust” is a great song for listeners to relate to on this album. The song states, “Our hearts don’t change from pups to dust,” and “Love does not cost money but is not free.” These lyrics are heartfelt and give listeners something they can relate to and enjoy.

Another track listeners should focus on is “Sugar Boats.” This song offers an amazing use of piano and orchestral instruments that also fuses great sounding guitar riffs. With such a dedicated fan base, those who already enjoy Modest Mouse can rejoice at this album and enjoy it in its entirety. Those who don’t normally listen to this type of music can find solace in hearing something new and refreshing.

Fans of Modest Mouse will also enjoy Spoon, Death Cab for Cutie and Silversun Pickups. This album warrants three stars out of five. Because there are so many elements to enjoy, fans of all types of music can begin to enjoy this group.

(Photo Courtesy of Deanne Jones)

Myler as Sharpless, the American Consul to Japan, in WSU’s recent production of “Madam Butterfly.” (Photo Courtesy of Deanne Jones)

How many undergraduate music students can claim they’ve been winning national composition competitions since their early teens? Derek Myler, a senior in Weber State University’s vocal program, is doing just that.

He routinely premiers new, original compositions with the WSU combined Chamber and Concert choirs and the WSU Symphonic Orchestra. In addition, he’s taken home awards from many prestigious competitions for his work. On March 25, students will have the opportunity to see Myler perform his senior recital, in which he will premiere a new, original work with the help of several other WSU music students.

“It’s been a really tremendous experience to work with somebody with the gifts and talents that Derek has,” Karen Bruestle, head of the voice and opera program and Myler’s private voice teacher, said. “He really encompasses the whole realm of musicianship and that, as his teacher, has been really fun.”

Myler just finished participating in WSU’s production of “Madam Butterfly,” as Sharpless, the American consul in Nagasaki, Japan. Bruestle explained that it’s  rare to find individuals with skill sets similar to Myler’s.

“It’s rare to find a student that not only possesses a really beautiful voice and is a very engaged, active performer, but is also a dynamic pianist and composer,” Bruestle said. “He’s a multifaceted musician and that’s pretty rare to have all of those elements in a student.”

Bruestle encouraged all students, especially non-music students, to come to Myler’s recital. Unlike many other student recitals, Bruestle said, Myler’s is a lecture recital, meaning he will stop and talk with the audience about the music between sets.

“It’s really very novel what he’s doing and I’m hoping it will set a standard for other students and encourage them to do the same thing in their recitals,” Bruestle said. “As an audience member, I always appreciate when the performer takes an interest in me and tells me about the music and how they feel about it.”

Catie Omer, a recent WSU graduate in vocal pedagogy, echoed Bruestle’s sentiments, noting Myler’s genius is accompanied by a humble attitude.

“Derek is a genius and he’s one of the most humble people about it,” Omer said. “He would never put himself out there claiming to be what he really is, and we used to joke that he’ll be the next Bach, but really he’s the next Charles Ives and his music is just brilliant.”

Omer said one of her favorite pieces of Myler’s is an emotional, yet beautiful, choral piece called “Christmas 1942, Auschwitz.”

“You can tell he’s very emotional about his music but also very analytical as well,” Omer said. “He doesn’t just let the music get away from him. He keeps it grounded and he has a purpose for everything that he’s doing.”

Omer noted that students who attend Myler’s recital can expect to hear different and interesting classical music.

“He always does music that’s not the traditional, standard that you hear at student recitals. He always does really interesting things you’ve never heard before,” Omer said.

Caleb Jardine, a friend of Myler’s and fellow student in the voice program, said he admires that ability.

“Derek’s music is hard to describe. It’s beautiful and deep,” Jardine said. “Derek is one of the most passionate people about music that I’ve ever met. He’s a genius.”

Myler’s senior recital will be March 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the Garrison Choral room in the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing arts and admission is free.

Myler as Sharpless, the American Consul to Japan, in WSU’s recent production of “Madam Butterfly.” (Photo Courtesy of Deanne Jones)

How many undergraduate music students can claim they’ve been winning national composition competitions since their early teens? Derek Myler, a senior in Weber State University’s vocal program, is doing just that.

He routinely premiers new, original compositions with the WSU combined Chamber and Concert choirs and the WSU Symphonic Orchestra. In addition, he’s taken home awards from many prestigious competitions for his work. On March 25, students will have the opportunity to see Myler perform his senior recital, in which he will premiere a new, original work with the help of several other WSU music students.

“It’s been a really tremendous experience to work with somebody with the gifts and talents that Derek has,” Karen Bruestle, head of the voice and opera program and Myler’s private voice teacher, said. “He really encompasses the whole realm of musicianship and that, as his teacher, has been really fun.”

Myler just finished participating in WSU’s production of “Madam Butterfly,” as Sharpless, the American consul in Nagasaki, Japan. Bruestle explained that it’s  rare to find individuals with skill sets similar to Myler’s.

“It’s rare to find a student that not only possesses a really beautiful voice and is a very engaged, active performer, but is also a dynamic pianist and composer,” Bruestle said. “He’s a multifaceted musician and that’s pretty rare to have all of those elements in a student.”

Bruestle encouraged all students, especially non-music students, to come to Myler’s recital. Unlike many other student recitals, Bruestle said, Myler’s is a lecture recital, meaning he will stop and talk with the audience about the music between sets.

“It’s really very novel what he’s doing and I’m hoping it will set a standard for other students and encourage them to do the same thing in their recitals,” Bruestle said. “As an audience member, I always appreciate when the performer takes an interest in me and tells me about the music and how they feel about it.”

Catie Omer, a recent WSU graduate in vocal pedagogy, echoed Bruestle’s sentiments, noting Myler’s genius is accompanied by a humble attitude.

“Derek is a genius and he’s one of the most humble people about it,” Omer said. “He would never put himself out there claiming to be what he really is, and we used to joke that he’ll be the next Bach, but really he’s the next Charles Ives and his music is just brilliant.”

Omer said one of her favorite pieces of Myler’s is an emotional, yet beautiful, choral piece called “Christmas 1942, Auschwitz.”

“You can tell he’s very emotional about his music but also very analytical as well,” Omer said. “He doesn’t just let the music get away from him. He keeps it grounded and he has a purpose for everything that he’s doing.”

Omer noted that students who attend Myler’s recital can expect to hear different and interesting classical music.

“He always does music that’s not the traditional, standard that you hear at student recitals. He always does really interesting things you’ve never heard before,” Omer said.

Caleb Jardine, a friend of Myler’s and fellow student in the voice program, said he admires that ability.

“Derek’s music is hard to describe. It’s beautiful and deep,” Jardine said. “Derek is one of the most passionate people about music that I’ve ever met. He’s a genius.”

Myler’s senior recital will be March 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the Garrison Choral room in the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing arts and admission is free.

(Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts & Humanities)

Root started teaching at WSU in 1984. Tuesday’s concert will mark the end of his career at WSU. (Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts & Humanities)

While the Val A. Browning Center holds so many beginnings for students, on March 24 it will fill with finality as professor Thomas Root performs in his last concert as director of the WSU Band.

Root has taught music at Weber State University for just over 30 years, focusing on music theory, composition and the WSU Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble. His final concert will exclusively feature music he’s composed during his time at WSU, performed by the WSU Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble and the WSU combined choirs.

“We’ve always done concerts together back as far as I can remember,” professor Mark Henderson, head of choral studies at WSU, said. Henderson explained that he and Root arrived at WSU within one year of each other. Since then, Henderson said the two have been happily working together on various projects.

Henderson said he would describe Root as an ideal colleague—personable, cooperative and very supportive.

“I never composed in college because we were required to do what was in academic style at the time, and I wasn’t interested in that,” Henderson said. “He was composing something almost once a year and I thought that was great. I think it kind of freed me to go ahead and compose the kind of things I wanted.”

Henderson said he recalled a time when he and Root attended a performance with a group of students. During the performance, Root whispered to the students, pointing out a favorite chord of his, an augmented sixth chord. Henderson was impressed by this experience and admired how Root continued to analyze the music and teach his students even though they weren’t in an academic setting.

Andrew Stapley, WSU senior in music education, said he appreciates Root’s attitude towards students and their unique situations.

“He really cares about everyone and he really wants them to succeed,” Stapley said. “As far as being a professor, he’s willing to work with all types of situations and help students do their best.”

Catie Omer, a graduate in vocal pedagogy, was one such student. Omer thought she would be able to graduate with no problems, but found to her great distress that she had overlooked one rarely taught class. Root offered to give Omer private lessons in the subject so she could proceed with her plans to graduate rather than having to take another semester worth of classes for one required class.

“My voice teacher Gary Sorensen once said (Root) is truly the salt of the Earth, and I would have to agree with him,” Omer said. “(Root) does anything and everything for his students for them to be successful.”

In addition, Omer said much of Root’s music is easy to enjoy, even if the listener doesn’t have a background in music.

“It reminds me a lot of movie music,” Omer said. “I know (Root) aspired to be a film composer when he was younger, and that very much shows through in his style. When you perform and listen to his music, you get that big, grand feeling.”

Root’s final concert will be March 24 at 7:30 p.m. in the Austad Theater of the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets are $6 and $7 and are available online or at the box office prior to the performance.

 

Root started teaching at WSU in 1984. Tuesday’s concert will mark the end of his career at WSU. (Courtesy of the Telitha E. Lindquist College of Arts & Humanities)

While the Val A. Browning Center holds so many beginnings for students, on March 24 it will fill with finality as professor Thomas Root performs in his last concert as director of the WSU Band.

Root has taught music at Weber State University for just over 30 years, focusing on music theory, composition and the WSU Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble. His final concert will exclusively feature music he’s composed during his time at WSU, performed by the WSU Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble and the WSU combined choirs.

“We’ve always done concerts together back as far as I can remember,” professor Mark Henderson, head of choral studies at WSU, said. Henderson explained that he and Root arrived at WSU within one year of each other. Since then, Henderson said the two have been happily working together on various projects.

Henderson said he would describe Root as an ideal colleague—personable, cooperative and very supportive.

“I never composed in college because we were required to do what was in academic style at the time, and I wasn’t interested in that,” Henderson said. “He was composing something almost once a year and I thought that was great. I think it kind of freed me to go ahead and compose the kind of things I wanted.”

Henderson said he recalled a time when he and Root attended a performance with a group of students. During the performance, Root whispered to the students, pointing out a favorite chord of his, an augmented sixth chord. Henderson was impressed by this experience and admired how Root continued to analyze the music and teach his students even though they weren’t in an academic setting.

Andrew Stapley, WSU senior in music education, said he appreciates Root’s attitude towards students and their unique situations.

“He really cares about everyone and he really wants them to succeed,” Stapley said. “As far as being a professor, he’s willing to work with all types of situations and help students do their best.”

Catie Omer, a graduate in vocal pedagogy, was one such student. Omer thought she would be able to graduate with no problems, but found to her great distress that she had overlooked one rarely taught class. Root offered to give Omer private lessons in the subject so she could proceed with her plans to graduate rather than having to take another semester worth of classes for one required class.

“My voice teacher Gary Sorensen once said (Root) is truly the salt of the Earth, and I would have to agree with him,” Omer said. “(Root) does anything and everything for his students for them to be successful.”

In addition, Omer said much of Root’s music is easy to enjoy, even if the listener doesn’t have a background in music.

“It reminds me a lot of movie music,” Omer said. “I know (Root) aspired to be a film composer when he was younger, and that very much shows through in his style. When you perform and listen to his music, you get that big, grand feeling.”

Root’s final concert will be March 24 at 7:30 p.m. in the Austad Theater of the Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts. Tickets are $6 and $7 and are available online or at the box office prior to the performance.

 

"Gliss Riffer" by Dan Deacon

“Gliss Riffer” by Dan Deacon

“Gliss Riffer,” Dan Deacon’s most recent album, debuted earlier in February. Following his previous works “Bromst” and “America,” Deacon creates an electronically driven theme with his new work. Influenced by artists like Talking Heads, Devo and Daft Punk, Deacon creates electronic beats fused with orchestral elements.

The short album presents elements that fans of electronic music can really appreciate. For non-electronic music listeners though, it can be easy to get lost in the repetitive emptiness of electronic sound.

For example, the track “Meme Generator” has interesting elements and easily catches the listeners attention, but the same elements repeat over and over for nearly five minutes. It’s comparable to listening to a Metallica song and zoning out for a long period of time, then coming back to the music and realizing it’s on a different song. It’s kind of trippy and a little bit unnerving.

The best song on the album is “Learning to Relax.” The track almost sounds like an 80′s pop tune with its high energy and interesting lyrics. It has repetitive elements as well but none that make the listener zone out.

Also, the track “Take it to the Max,” adds an interesting element to the album. The song as many layers that are slowly pile on top of each other. Using different stacked elements feels as if the song is building up to something.

If Deacon is an artist you come to enjoy, other artists like Animal Collective, and previously reviewed artist Panda Bear will fulfill your electronic needs. Two stars would have to be the rating for this album because this type of music caters to such a specific fan base, which I am not a part of.

“Gliss Riffer” by Dan Deacon

“Gliss Riffer,” Dan Deacon’s most recent album, debuted earlier in February. Following his previous works “Bromst” and “America,” Deacon creates an electronically driven theme with his new work. Influenced by artists like Talking Heads, Devo and Daft Punk, Deacon creates electronic beats fused with orchestral elements.

The short album presents elements that fans of electronic music can really appreciate. For non-electronic music listeners though, it can be easy to get lost in the repetitive emptiness of electronic sound.

For example, the track “Meme Generator” has interesting elements and easily catches the listeners attention, but the same elements repeat over and over for nearly five minutes. It’s comparable to listening to a Metallica song and zoning out for a long period of time, then coming back to the music and realizing it’s on a different song. It’s kind of trippy and a little bit unnerving.

The best song on the album is “Learning to Relax.” The track almost sounds like an 80′s pop tune with its high energy and interesting lyrics. It has repetitive elements as well but none that make the listener zone out.

Also, the track “Take it to the Max,” adds an interesting element to the album. The song as many layers that are slowly pile on top of each other. Using different stacked elements feels as if the song is building up to something.

If Deacon is an artist you come to enjoy, other artists like Animal Collective, and previously reviewed artist Panda Bear will fulfill your electronic needs. Two stars would have to be the rating for this album because this type of music caters to such a specific fan base, which I am not a part of.

"First Four" is a combination of Doe's previously released EP's.

Straight out of London, the trio known as Doe released their album “First Four,” a combination of four previously released EP’s. This pop punk band is influenced by 90s favorites like Sleater-Kinney, Pavement and Weezer.

Only featuring a singer, guitarist and a drummer, the band brings a unique sound to the realm of pop punk. Although the band has no bass, there is great energy in the rhythms produced by the guitar. The album alternates from throbbing, in-your-face riffs to catchy pop licks. Along with this, singer Nicola Leel penetrates listeners’ ears with powerful vocals.

While listening, I found myself making comparisons to the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s. Leel really shows off her chops in songs like “Late Bloomer,” “Oh, Nostalgia!” and “Let Me In.” Not only this, but the aforementioned guitar rhythms offered on this album are great. Songs like “Let Me In” and “Julia Survived” really get the listener pumped when hearing the rhythms.

Leel’s voice in this album is very genuine and powerful. She doesn’t force too much, and sings very honestly. To me this can give listeners a very good sense of girl power because there isn’t anything holding Leel back. She sings her heart out and jams with her fellow band mates. The London based group states on their website that they like “Feminism, horror films and brown beer.”

This band doesn’t leave much for listeners to complain about. They are a group that fans of harder music, as well as more alternative listeners, can get into. If this band tickles your fancy, bands such as The Pixies, Baby Ghosts, and Olive Drab will do the same. This album gets three stars out of five.

 

Straight out of London, the trio known as Doe released their album “First Four,” a combination of four previously released EP’s. This pop punk band is influenced by 90s favorites like Sleater-Kinney, Pavement and Weezer.

Only featuring a singer, guitarist and a drummer, the band brings a unique sound to the realm of pop punk. Although the band has no bass, there is great energy in the rhythms produced by the guitar. The album alternates from throbbing, in-your-face riffs to catchy pop licks. Along with this, singer Nicola Leel penetrates listeners’ ears with powerful vocals.

While listening, I found myself making comparisons to the Yeah Yeah Yeah’s. Leel really shows off her chops in songs like “Late Bloomer,” “Oh, Nostalgia!” and “Let Me In.” Not only this, but the aforementioned guitar rhythms offered on this album are great. Songs like “Let Me In” and “Julia Survived” really get the listener pumped when hearing the rhythms.

Leel’s voice in this album is very genuine and powerful. She doesn’t force too much, and sings very honestly. To me this can give listeners a very good sense of girl power because there isn’t anything holding Leel back. She sings her heart out and jams with her fellow band mates. The London based group states on their website that they like “Feminism, horror films and brown beer.”

This band doesn’t leave much for listeners to complain about. They are a group that fans of harder music, as well as more alternative listeners, can get into. If this band tickles your fancy, bands such as The Pixies, Baby Ghosts, and Olive Drab will do the same. This album gets three stars out of five.

 

The cast of Weber State's production of "Madame Butterfly" pause for a photo during rehearsal.  (Source photo)

The cast of Weber State’s production of “Madame Butterfly” pause for a photo during rehearsal. (Source photo)

On March 5-8, the Val A. Browning Center for Performing Arts will be filled with Italian and Japanese culture as the Weber State University’s music department will perform Puccini’s opera “Madame Butterfly.”

Set in turn-of-the-century Nagasaki, Japan, audience members will watch as Chio-Chio san, nicknamed Butterfly, falls in love with American naval officer Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton. Butterfly is so in love with Pinkerton she converts to Christianity for him. Because of this decision, Butterfly is disowned by her Buddhist family, leaving her completely alone once Pinkerton has to return to sea. Three years later, Butterfly has borne and raised Pinkerton’s son while she pines for her lost husband. Pinkerton returns, but this time with his American wife. Distraught, Butterfly commits jigaki, ceremonial suicide.

Karen Bruestle, head of the vocal department and opera director, has wanted to perform “Madam Butterfly” for the past several years. Finally, this year she felt she had the right group of students to perform Pucinni’s Opera.

“I wanted to do something very dramatic, very passionate, something that emphasizes the tragedy of human nature and this was just the right time to do it,” Bruestle said.

The preparation for “Madame Butterfly” has taken months worth of hard work. “Auditions were in October 2014 and rehearsal began by late October,” Bruestle said. “About two weeks after auditions, rehearsals began so they really have been working on this musically since last semester.”

According to Bruestle, the most challenging part for actors wasn’t grasping the Italian language of the show but accurately portraying the emotions and passion needed for this opera.

“The music of Puccini it is very challenging for the singers and it is very dramatic,” Bruestle said. “There is a lot of give and take within the music itself. You have to know when to give and moving ahead with the music and when to pull back.”

For Christine Warren, senior and vocal pedagogy major, the excitement to perform in “Madame Butterfly” is evident in her voice.  Warren has prepared for her two roles of geisha and Kate Pinkerton by watching YouTube videos of others who have performed her roles as well as asking her director for direction on how to correctly portray her character.

Catie Omer, WSU alumni and assistant vocal director, wanted to be involved with “Madame Butterfly” because it is one of her favorite operas. Omer’s role was to fine-tune the actors’ voices and give the opera the right sound. She felt her job was rather easy because of the actors’ talent.

“There are a few things here and there, such as you need to be more intense or you need to be more angry, but they are right on point,” Omer said.

While the Italian singing can be a turn-off for some beginning opera-goers, this is one that will be easy for beginners to follow. “I think for first-time opera seers, this one is a good one to see. I remember when I was younger and hadn’t been exposed to opera, I thought ‘that is such an intense sound,’ but again, this one is the story and the way the story flows really well. I think with the supertitles you’ll get it really fast,” Omer said.

The cast of Weber State’s production of “Madame Butterfly” pause for a photo during rehearsal. (Source photo)

On March 5-8, the Val A. Browning Center for Performing Arts will be filled with Italian and Japanese culture as the Weber State University’s music department will perform Puccini’s opera “Madame Butterfly.”

Set in turn-of-the-century Nagasaki, Japan, audience members will watch as Chio-Chio san, nicknamed Butterfly, falls in love with American naval officer Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton. Butterfly is so in love with Pinkerton she converts to Christianity for him. Because of this decision, Butterfly is disowned by her Buddhist family, leaving her completely alone once Pinkerton has to return to sea. Three years later, Butterfly has borne and raised Pinkerton’s son while she pines for her lost husband. Pinkerton returns, but this time with his American wife. Distraught, Butterfly commits jigaki, ceremonial suicide.

Karen Bruestle, head of the vocal department and opera director, has wanted to perform “Madam Butterfly” for the past several years. Finally, this year she felt she had the right group of students to perform Pucinni’s Opera.

“I wanted to do something very dramatic, very passionate, something that emphasizes the tragedy of human nature and this was just the right time to do it,” Bruestle said.

The preparation for “Madame Butterfly” has taken months worth of hard work. “Auditions were in October 2014 and rehearsal began by late October,” Bruestle said. “About two weeks after auditions, rehearsals began so they really have been working on this musically since last semester.”

According to Bruestle, the most challenging part for actors wasn’t grasping the Italian language of the show but accurately portraying the emotions and passion needed for this opera.

“The music of Puccini it is very challenging for the singers and it is very dramatic,” Bruestle said. “There is a lot of give and take within the music itself. You have to know when to give and moving ahead with the music and when to pull back.”

For Christine Warren, senior and vocal pedagogy major, the excitement to perform in “Madame Butterfly” is evident in her voice.  Warren has prepared for her two roles of geisha and Kate Pinkerton by watching YouTube videos of others who have performed her roles as well as asking her director for direction on how to correctly portray her character.

Catie Omer, WSU alumni and assistant vocal director, wanted to be involved with “Madame Butterfly” because it is one of her favorite operas. Omer’s role was to fine-tune the actors’ voices and give the opera the right sound. She felt her job was rather easy because of the actors’ talent.

“There are a few things here and there, such as you need to be more intense or you need to be more angry, but they are right on point,” Omer said.

While the Italian singing can be a turn-off for some beginning opera-goers, this is one that will be easy for beginners to follow. “I think for first-time opera seers, this one is a good one to see. I remember when I was younger and hadn’t been exposed to opera, I thought ‘that is such an intense sound,’ but again, this one is the story and the way the story flows really well. I think with the supertitles you’ll get it really fast,” Omer said.

Most people are in a constant search for new music or new musicians. These are some up-and-coming musicians who are on the rise in 2015.

Bea Miller

Bea Miller, at the young age of 15 is just as, if not more, accomplished than most musicians much older than her.

In 2012, Miller signed a record label with Hollywood Records after becoming a finalist on the X-Factor. This is the year that Miller will release her debut album “Young Blood.” Her hit single “Young Blood” is frequently heard on radio stations.

Ella Henderson

Another X-Factor contestant, Ella Henderson finally debut her single “Ghost” this January. The song quickly topped the charts in the UK, Germany and Australia.

Ella-Henderson

Musician Ella Henderson posing on the red carpet. (Source: Healthyceleb.com)

Henderson is on the rise and definitely worth checking out in the music world.

Will Butler

Will Butler is an indie artist with a lot of ambition. After playing with Arcade Fire for almost 10 years, Butler has finally decided to return as a solo act.

His newest album “Policy,” will debut in March of this year.

Maddie + Tae

Maddie and Tae are a dynamite country duo, though they sparked some controversy with their chart-topping song, “Girl in a Country Song.”

Maddie and Tae currently sit at top five in the country music chart, let’s see where they go in the country music world from here.

Wolf Alice

These London rockers present a sound that resembles the band Hole. Wolf Alice opened at London’s O2 arena at the beginning of this year.

They plan to release their debut album sometime this year, so keep your eyes peeled for that album.

Most people are in a constant search for new music or new musicians. These are some up-and-coming musicians who are on the rise in 2015.

Bea Miller

Bea Miller, at the young age of 15 is just as, if not more, accomplished than most musicians much older than her.

In 2012, Miller signed a record label with Hollywood Records after becoming a finalist on the X-Factor. This is the year that Miller will release her debut album “Young Blood.” Her hit single “Young Blood” is frequently heard on radio stations.

Ella Henderson

Another X-Factor contestant, Ella Henderson finally debut her single “Ghost” this January. The song quickly topped the charts in the UK, Germany and Australia.

Musician Ella Henderson posing on the red carpet. (Source: Healthyceleb.com)

Henderson is on the rise and definitely worth checking out in the music world.

Will Butler

Will Butler is an indie artist with a lot of ambition. After playing with Arcade Fire for almost 10 years, Butler has finally decided to return as a solo act.

His newest album “Policy,” will debut in March of this year.

Maddie + Tae

Maddie and Tae are a dynamite country duo, though they sparked some controversy with their chart-topping song, “Girl in a Country Song.”

Maddie and Tae currently sit at top five in the country music chart, let’s see where they go in the country music world from here.

Wolf Alice

These London rockers present a sound that resembles the band Hole. Wolf Alice opened at London’s O2 arena at the beginning of this year.

They plan to release their debut album sometime this year, so keep your eyes peeled for that album.

Pete RG features a soulful experience for listeners.

Pete RG features a soulful experience for listeners.

To start, Pete RG offers a wonderful surprise to those who give this duo a try. From the first track, it’s easy to fall in love with the music featured on “Lightning Strikes.”

I have to say that I was completely captivated by the first track on this album, “Still Here.” The vocals are so unique and different that it wasn’t hard to listen to this album in its entirety.

Pete RG’s voice is rustic and soulful. In a way, RG’s voice sounds like an alternative version of Frank Sinatra. Along with co-producer Brina Kabler, this duo puts their listeners in a sort of trance with their music.

“Still Here” is the track that caught my attention the most. Because it’s the first track, it opens the listener’s ears and makes them not want the song to end. Not only are the words sweet and emotional, but the instruments pair so well with RG’s voice that it creates a calming and happy effect that makes you want to sit down and listen to the track over and over.

Later in the album, there is an acoustic version of the song that is just amazing. I’ve made it known in previous reviews that I love acoustic tracks, but I’ll reiterate it once again. There’s something magical about taking out all instruments besides a guitar that makes a song tug at your heart strings.

The other great song on this album is “I’m on Fire.” This song allows listeners to get a taste of the duo singing together on another acoustic track. This song captivated me just as much as “Still Here,” but my only complaint is that it’s two minutes shorter than the rest of the songs on the album.

While these songs hit it out of the park, the rest of the album couldn’t get me quite as excited. For instance, the track entitled “Patient Hearts” seemed to have a disconnection that made it difficult to enjoy.

Overall, this Los Angeles native duo is worth looking into, especially with such a unique vocal aspect. If Pete RG’s sound is one you enjoy, check out other groups like Rachel Mac & the Revival, Valeri Lopez, and Avi Vinocur. This group gets four stars out of five because, as I mentioned before, listening to this group has been a pleasant surprise. I would recommend them to fans of alternative, as well as fans of heavier music.

Pete RG features a soulful experience for listeners.

To start, Pete RG offers a wonderful surprise to those who give this duo a try. From the first track, it’s easy to fall in love with the music featured on “Lightning Strikes.”

I have to say that I was completely captivated by the first track on this album, “Still Here.” The vocals are so unique and different that it wasn’t hard to listen to this album in its entirety.

Pete RG’s voice is rustic and soulful. In a way, RG’s voice sounds like an alternative version of Frank Sinatra. Along with co-producer Brina Kabler, this duo puts their listeners in a sort of trance with their music.

“Still Here” is the track that caught my attention the most. Because it’s the first track, it opens the listener’s ears and makes them not want the song to end. Not only are the words sweet and emotional, but the instruments pair so well with RG’s voice that it creates a calming and happy effect that makes you want to sit down and listen to the track over and over.

Later in the album, there is an acoustic version of the song that is just amazing. I’ve made it known in previous reviews that I love acoustic tracks, but I’ll reiterate it once again. There’s something magical about taking out all instruments besides a guitar that makes a song tug at your heart strings.

The other great song on this album is “I’m on Fire.” This song allows listeners to get a taste of the duo singing together on another acoustic track. This song captivated me just as much as “Still Here,” but my only complaint is that it’s two minutes shorter than the rest of the songs on the album.

While these songs hit it out of the park, the rest of the album couldn’t get me quite as excited. For instance, the track entitled “Patient Hearts” seemed to have a disconnection that made it difficult to enjoy.

Overall, this Los Angeles native duo is worth looking into, especially with such a unique vocal aspect. If Pete RG’s sound is one you enjoy, check out other groups like Rachel Mac & the Revival, Valeri Lopez, and Avi Vinocur. This group gets four stars out of five because, as I mentioned before, listening to this group has been a pleasant surprise. I would recommend them to fans of alternative, as well as fans of heavier music.

The Districts' latest album offers music to a wide variety of listeners.

The Districts’ latest album offers music to a wide variety of listeners.

Pennsylvania natives The Districts offer a great listen to fans with their latest work “A Flourish and a Spoil.” Driven by emotion and high energy, this album is great for any alternative or rock fan.

Formed in 2009, the band’s website said they are excited to share their new album with the world. The first thing listed on their website says, “We write honest music and are passionate about doing so.” Reading this after listening to “A Flourish and a Spoil,” I can tell the band definitely lives up to this idea. Upon beginning the album, I got a feeling the music was very well thought out. The band is able to produce a fun sound and honest lyrics.

The songs that stick out the most are “Suburban Smell,” “Bold” and “6 AM.” Two of these songs are acoustic, and while I am a huge fan of heavy rhythms produced by electric guitar, I think acoustic songs let the listener hear a different, more personal side of the artist. With acoustic music, more emotion is evoked, and when you can hear the lyrics, it’s very raw.

The track entitled “Bold,” however, is on the opposite end of the spectrum. This is a very high energy, almost angry song. With a different tempo and a darker sound, the band does a great job of conveying their feelings.

The other thing about this album that is enjoyable is that the music doesn’t overshadow the vocals and vice versa. There is a great balance of tone with the guitar and drums. Personally, I enjoy when I can hear what a singer is saying, especially with The Districts’ interesting lyrics.

There isn’t much to dislike about this group, and the album isn’t hard to listen to all the way through. During the course of listening to this album, I didn’t feel compelled to skip any of the songs.

If The Districts is a band you enjoy, check out other artists like Pickwick, Hey Anna and The Futures League. This album can easily score a four out of five when it comes to ratings. This album can make you want to dance, want to sit and listen to the words in great detail and even pick up a guitar and play a soft melody.

The Districts’ latest album offers music to a wide variety of listeners.

Pennsylvania natives The Districts offer a great listen to fans with their latest work “A Flourish and a Spoil.” Driven by emotion and high energy, this album is great for any alternative or rock fan.

Formed in 2009, the band’s website said they are excited to share their new album with the world. The first thing listed on their website says, “We write honest music and are passionate about doing so.” Reading this after listening to “A Flourish and a Spoil,” I can tell the band definitely lives up to this idea. Upon beginning the album, I got a feeling the music was very well thought out. The band is able to produce a fun sound and honest lyrics.

The songs that stick out the most are “Suburban Smell,” “Bold” and “6 AM.” Two of these songs are acoustic, and while I am a huge fan of heavy rhythms produced by electric guitar, I think acoustic songs let the listener hear a different, more personal side of the artist. With acoustic music, more emotion is evoked, and when you can hear the lyrics, it’s very raw.

The track entitled “Bold,” however, is on the opposite end of the spectrum. This is a very high energy, almost angry song. With a different tempo and a darker sound, the band does a great job of conveying their feelings.

The other thing about this album that is enjoyable is that the music doesn’t overshadow the vocals and vice versa. There is a great balance of tone with the guitar and drums. Personally, I enjoy when I can hear what a singer is saying, especially with The Districts’ interesting lyrics.

There isn’t much to dislike about this group, and the album isn’t hard to listen to all the way through. During the course of listening to this album, I didn’t feel compelled to skip any of the songs.

If The Districts is a band you enjoy, check out other artists like Pickwick, Hey Anna and The Futures League. This album can easily score a four out of five when it comes to ratings. This album can make you want to dance, want to sit and listen to the words in great detail and even pick up a guitar and play a soft melody.

(Courtesy of Ogden Symphony Ballet Association)

Ann Hampton Callaway, above, will be the guest soloist at OSBA’s “The Streisand Songbook” event. (Courtesy of Ogden Symphony Ballet Association)

Utah Symphony and the Ogden Symphony Ballet Association have joined forces for over 60 years to bring performances to Ogden.  Their concerts appeal to all audiences and ages. This weekend, they’re teaming together to honor Broadway diva Barbra Streisand.

“These concerts are really popular,” Sharon Macfarlane, executive director of the OSBA, said. “It’s a tribute to Barbra Streisand and her songs. We expect a pretty amazing rendition of her.”

“The Streisand Songbook” is one of five concerts where the OSBA teams with the Utah Symphony in order to honor music and musicians. This concert features Jerry Steichen as the conductor and Ann Hampton Callaway as a guest vocalist.

“It’s the second best thing you will see to seeing Barbra Streisand live,” Susan Campbell, education development coordinator of OSBA, said. She added that Calloway has written many songs for Streisand and she is “knowledgeable in her style”

According to biography.com, “Barbra Streisand is the highest-selling female recording artist of all time, and has won awards that acclaim in every medium that she’s worked in.” The site added that Streisand has also done a range of charity work.

“Each concert is a little bit different than the other,” Macfarlane said. “But I think the fact is that when you say ‘Streisand’ you know immediately pretty much what it’s going to be sounding like. I think this will appeal to most all ages.”

According to their website, the Utah Symphony was founded in 1940 and is one of America’s major symphony orchestras. While many symphony orchestras play strictly classical symphony music, “The Streisand Songbook,” would be considered a pop concert.

“The pop series was not something that I would have attended on my own,” Campbell said. “I’m more of a classical girl. What I really enjoy about these concerts is the opportunity to see Broadway singers.”

The most popular Broadway shows Streisand is known for are “Funny Girl” and “I Can Get It For You Wholesale.”

She added, “It’s just amazing to see how personable they can be in singing and how entertaining they can be and how they interact with the audience.”

Callaway, the guest artist for “The Streisand Songbook,” is a singer, actress and producer, according to annhamptoncallaway.com. She’s bringing her unique style to the Browning Center to honor Streisand by singing some of her famous pieces.

“The symphony is amazing on its own but when you add in these guest artists, it’s like you’re getting two shows in one,” Macfarlane said.

Tickets for “The Streisand Songbook” range from $26 to $44. WSU students can get into any available seating for only $12 with a Weber State issued ID when tickets are purchase at the venue or over the phone the day of the performance.

Campbell explained this is a great opportunity to see the Utah Symphony in Ogden. Usually audience members have to travel to Salt Lake City to enjoy the Utah Symphony.  “We’re the only people who bring the symphony up to Ogden,” Campbell said. “It’s important to bring that up here so it can be a part of the community.”

Ann Hampton Callaway, above, will be the guest soloist at OSBA’s “The Streisand Songbook” event. (Courtesy of Ogden Symphony Ballet Association)

Utah Symphony and the Ogden Symphony Ballet Association have joined forces for over 60 years to bring performances to Ogden.  Their concerts appeal to all audiences and ages. This weekend, they’re teaming together to honor Broadway diva Barbra Streisand.

“These concerts are really popular,” Sharon Macfarlane, executive director of the OSBA, said. “It’s a tribute to Barbra Streisand and her songs. We expect a pretty amazing rendition of her.”

“The Streisand Songbook” is one of five concerts where the OSBA teams with the Utah Symphony in order to honor music and musicians. This concert features Jerry Steichen as the conductor and Ann Hampton Callaway as a guest vocalist.

“It’s the second best thing you will see to seeing Barbra Streisand live,” Susan Campbell, education development coordinator of OSBA, said. She added that Calloway has written many songs for Streisand and she is “knowledgeable in her style”

According to biography.com, “Barbra Streisand is the highest-selling female recording artist of all time, and has won awards that acclaim in every medium that she’s worked in.” The site added that Streisand has also done a range of charity work.

“Each concert is a little bit different than the other,” Macfarlane said. “But I think the fact is that when you say ‘Streisand’ you know immediately pretty much what it’s going to be sounding like. I think this will appeal to most all ages.”

According to their website, the Utah Symphony was founded in 1940 and is one of America’s major symphony orchestras. While many symphony orchestras play strictly classical symphony music, “The Streisand Songbook,” would be considered a pop concert.

“The pop series was not something that I would have attended on my own,” Campbell said. “I’m more of a classical girl. What I really enjoy about these concerts is the opportunity to see Broadway singers.”

The most popular Broadway shows Streisand is known for are “Funny Girl” and “I Can Get It For You Wholesale.”

She added, “It’s just amazing to see how personable they can be in singing and how entertaining they can be and how they interact with the audience.”

Callaway, the guest artist for “The Streisand Songbook,” is a singer, actress and producer, according to annhamptoncallaway.com. She’s bringing her unique style to the Browning Center to honor Streisand by singing some of her famous pieces.

“The symphony is amazing on its own but when you add in these guest artists, it’s like you’re getting two shows in one,” Macfarlane said.

Tickets for “The Streisand Songbook” range from $26 to $44. WSU students can get into any available seating for only $12 with a Weber State issued ID when tickets are purchase at the venue or over the phone the day of the performance.

Campbell explained this is a great opportunity to see the Utah Symphony in Ogden. Usually audience members have to travel to Salt Lake City to enjoy the Utah Symphony.  “We’re the only people who bring the symphony up to Ogden,” Campbell said. “It’s important to bring that up here so it can be a part of the community.”

'Picture You' is The Amazing's third album

‘Picture You’ is The Amazing’s third album I think we need a source on the photo?

The Swedish group The Amazing and their outspoken front man, Christoffer Gunrup, were able to do a lot with their latest work “Picture You.” With everything from funk sounds to acoustic melodies, this album was very well thought out.

The Amazing is a somewhat difficult band to describe, and even Gunrup has stated on the band’s website, “I have no idea how to describe the songs.” He also states that it’s just best to play and to not theorize about the music too much.

This is a group that not only has the ability to sound somber and ambiguous at times but can also switch feeling and sound from song to song. Many of the songs utilize completely instrumental portions that make one feel a release of pent-up emotions. Songs such as “Circles” and “Fryshusfunk” are prime examples of this.

In “Circles,” the song digresses into a musical progression that really builds on itself. You can hear each instrument, and it creates a soulful and tranquil feeling. The melody played in this song adds a very human quality to the music that any listener can relate to. “Fryshusfunk,” as the name indicates, turns into a funky fusion of guitars and drums that you could easily dance to.

I don’t have many complaints about this group other than perhaps the vocals. In this album, distinguishing the words is not as easy as I personally prefer. To me, lyrics can be very powerful, and I feel that if the words were more clear, the group could have made a bigger impact on their listeners.

If The Amazing is a group you enjoy, bands such as The Black Swans, Cass McCombs and Jonathan Wilson will also do the trick. As for ratings, this album gets 3.5 stars out of five. The differing sounds and instrumental portions are amazing to listen to, but  the vocals just aren’t all there. Sorry Gunrup, it’s my job to theorize.

‘Picture You’ is The Amazing’s third album I think we need a source on the photo?

The Swedish group The Amazing and their outspoken front man, Christoffer Gunrup, were able to do a lot with their latest work “Picture You.” With everything from funk sounds to acoustic melodies, this album was very well thought out.

The Amazing is a somewhat difficult band to describe, and even Gunrup has stated on the band’s website, “I have no idea how to describe the songs.” He also states that it’s just best to play and to not theorize about the music too much.

This is a group that not only has the ability to sound somber and ambiguous at times but can also switch feeling and sound from song to song. Many of the songs utilize completely instrumental portions that make one feel a release of pent-up emotions. Songs such as “Circles” and “Fryshusfunk” are prime examples of this.

In “Circles,” the song digresses into a musical progression that really builds on itself. You can hear each instrument, and it creates a soulful and tranquil feeling. The melody played in this song adds a very human quality to the music that any listener can relate to. “Fryshusfunk,” as the name indicates, turns into a funky fusion of guitars and drums that you could easily dance to.

I don’t have many complaints about this group other than perhaps the vocals. In this album, distinguishing the words is not as easy as I personally prefer. To me, lyrics can be very powerful, and I feel that if the words were more clear, the group could have made a bigger impact on their listeners.

If The Amazing is a group you enjoy, bands such as The Black Swans, Cass McCombs and Jonathan Wilson will also do the trick. As for ratings, this album gets 3.5 stars out of five. The differing sounds and instrumental portions are amazing to listen to, but  the vocals just aren’t all there. Sorry Gunrup, it’s my job to theorize.

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